Surface Tension

The shape of the drops is caused by the surface tension of the water. The only reason the drop of water isn’t completely spherical is because of the force of gravity pulling down on it. In the absence of gravity, the drop would minimize the surface area in order to minimize tension, which would result in a perfectly spherical shape.

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Raindrops

Raindrops begin forming when water vapor condenses on micrometer-sized particles of dust floating in the atmosphere. The dust particles grow to millimeter-sized droplets, which are heavy enough to begin falling. As they fall, the droplets accumulate more and more moisture, until they become the large raindrops that we see here on the ground.

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Purity

Lilacs are often considered to symbolize love . In Greece, Lebanon, and Cyprus, the lilac is strongly associated with Easter time because it flowers around that time; it is consequently called paschalia.

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An important meeting

The garden snail (Helix aspersa) is a terrestrial gastropod mollusk and one of the best-known species in the world. It is so common that it is one of the most proliferated terrestrial mollusks.
The helix aspersa is also known as “European Brown Garden Snail,” but its scientific is under discussion. Some scientists think this snail is “Cornu aspersum,” “Cantareus aspersus” or “Cryptomphalus aspersus.”

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Paste Fericit


The modern English term Easter, cognate with modern Dutch ooster and German Ostern, developed from an Old English word that usually appears in the form Ēastrun, -on, or -an; but also as Ēastru, -o; and Ēastre or Ēostre.[nb 3] The most widely accepted theory of the origin of the term is that it is derived from the name of an Old English goddess mentioned by the 7th to 8th-century English monk Bede, who wrote that Ēosturmōnaþ (Old English ‘Month of Ēostre’, translated in Bede’s time as “Paschal month”) was an English month, corresponding to April, which he says “was once called after a goddess of theirs named Ēostre, in whose honour feasts were celebrated in that month”.[22]
In Latin and Greek, the Christian celebration was, and still is, called Pascha (Greek: Πάσχα), a word derived from Aramaic פסחא (Paskha), cognate to Hebrew פֶּסַח (Pesach). The word originally denoted the Jewish festival known in English as Passover, commemorating the Jewish Exodus from slavery in Egypt.[23][24] Already in the 50s of the 1st century, Paul, writing from Ephesus to the Christians in Corinth,[25] applied the term to Christ, and it is unlikely that the Ephesian and Corinthian Christians were the first to hear Exodus 12 interpreted as speaking about the death of Jesus, not just about the Jewish Passover ritual.[26] In most of the non-English speaking world, the feast is known by names derived from Greek and Latin Pascha.[2][27] Pascha is also a name by which Jesus himself is remembered in the Orthodox Church, especially in connection with his resurrection and with the season of its celebration.

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Duminica Floriilor

In Romania and Moldova, Palm Sunday is known as Duminica Floriilor or simply Florii, translating Flowers’ Sunday.

In ancient times, palm branches symbolized goodness and victory. They were often depicted on coins and important buildings. Solomon had palm branches carved into the walls and doors of the temple (1 Kings 6:29). Again at the end of the Bible, people from every nation raise palm branches to honor Jesus (Revelation 7:9).

Palm Sunday commemorates the entrance of Jesus into Jerusalem (Matthew 21:1-9), when palm branches were placed in his path, before his arrest on Holy Thursday and his crucifixion on Good Friday. It thus marks the beginning of Holy Week, the final week of Lent.

 

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My lovely golden American

My little golden american

 

Based on Wikipedia, my golden-brown retriever seems to be an American Retriever.

But for sure, he is the most cute, clever and smart dog.
He learned only one lesson:

-Go back in your cage!
Instantly, he lay down and plays the death

Very clever doggy 😀

  • Aperture: ƒ/4
  • Camera: Canon EOS 450D
  • Taken: 1 April, 2017
  • Flash fired: yes
  • Focal length: 60mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Shutter speed: 1/60s

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Pinky

Bougainvillea (/ˌbuːɡᵻnˈvɪliə/ or /ˌboʊɡᵻnˈvɪliə/) is a genus of thorny ornamental vines, bushes, and trees with flower-like spring leaves near its flowers. Different authors accept between four and 18 species in the genus. They are native plants of West Africa Gambia, South America from Brazil west to Peru and south to southern Argentina (Chubut Province). Bougainvillea are also known as buganvilla (Spain), bugambilia (Mexico, Guatemala, Cuba, Philippines), pokok bunga kertas (Indonesia), “‘bougenville”‘ (Pakistan), Napoleón (Honduras), jahanamiya (Arab World), veranera (Colombia, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Costa Rica and Panama), trinitaria (Colombia, Panama, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic & Venezuela), Santa Rita (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay) or papelillo (northern Peru).

  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Taken: 18 August, 2016
  • Focal length: 135mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Shutter speed: 1/200s